Oilfield Pit Groundwater and 1950s Arsenic Corrosion Inhibitor Usage, Lake St. John Field, LA: Possible Causes and Models for Arsenic and Iron Patterns

Mary L. Barrett, Department of Geology & Geography, Centenary College of Louisiana, Shreveport, LA 71104: mbarrett@centenary.edu EXTENDED ABSTRACT At the Lake St. John (LSJ) Field, Concordia Parish, LA, dissolved arsenic in shallow groundwater (8 ft to 22 ft below ground surface) occurs in former emergency pit areas associated with tank …

Continue reading

Baton Rouge groundwater model development

Hai V. Pham, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803: hpham28@lsu.edu; Frank T.-C. Tsai, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803: ftsai@lsu.edu This study develops a high-resolution three-dimensional groundwater model to simulate saltwater encroachment due to the massive …

Continue reading

Spatial Variations in Groundwater Chemistry, Southern Hills Aquifer System – A Three-Dimensional View

Jeffrey S. Hanor, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803: hanor@lsu.edu Potable Na-HCO3 groundwaters are characteristic of siliciclastic aquifers in the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coastal plains. The origin of these waters has been variously attributed to cation (base) exchange and to silicate hydrolysis. …

Continue reading

Simulation of Groundwater Flow and Chloride Transport in the “2,000-foot” Sand of the Baton Rouge Area, Louisiana, with Scenarios to Mitigate Saltwater Migration

Charles E. Heywood, 2131 Pleasant Hills Ct., Ridgeway, Colo. 81432, cheywood@usgs.gov; John K. Lovelace, 3535 S. Sherwood Forest Blvd., Suite 120, Baton Rouge, La. 70816, jlovelac@usgs.gov Groundwater withdrawals have caused saltwater to encroach into freshwater-bearing aquifers beneath Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Groundwater investigations in the 1960s identified a freshwater-saltwater interface located …

Continue reading

Hydraulic Conductivity and Compressibility of Organic Clays in New Orleans

Navid H. Jafari, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, 70803, njafari@lsu.edu Evaluating the field-scale hydraulic conductivity and compressibility of soft organic clays that dominate fluvial-deltaic deposits is important for determining migration of contaminants and magnitude of subsidence. For example, the large concentration of chemical industry and …

Continue reading

Developing a Groundwater Regulatory Plan to Address Land Subsidence along the Texas Gulf Coast – The Harris-Galveston Subsidence District’s Approach to Mitigating the Problem

Bill Thaman, Freese and Nichols, Inc.10431 Morado Circle, Bldg 5, Ste 300, Austin, Texas 78759 wjt@freese.com; and Michael Turco, General Manager, Harris-Galveston Subsidence District, 1660 West Bay Area Boulevard, Friendswood, Texas 77546, mturco@subsidence.org Significant historical land subsidence, 6-10 feet in some areas, and about 13 feet in the Houston Ship …

Continue reading